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Sides in Regina refinery labour dispute lay down conditions for talks to resume

Screen Shot 2019-12-16 at 3.27.01 PMThe owner of a Saskatchewan oil refinery where workers are locked out in a contract dispute says there has been a discussion with Unifor about returning to bargaining, but the union wants the premier to step in.

Federated Co-operatives Ltd. says it won’t bargain as long as union members continue to block access to the Regina plant.

“We respect Unifor’s right to picket and peacefully protest but they need to adhere to the court’s order,” a company spokesman said Thursday in a statement.

Unifor President Jerry Dias said the company is moving the goalposts as to what conditions need to be met to resume bargaining. He said the union has already done its part.

“My guess is if we were to take down the barricades and everybody went home … they would have another condition the next morning,” Dias, flanked by members of Unifor’s bargaining committee, said at a news conference.

“We are prepared for a major de-escalation of this fight on the condition that they remove the scabs from the workplace.”

Unifor called on Premier Scott Moe to demand that both sides go to the bargaining table and work with a provincial mediator.

“A provincially appointed mediator is already in place, and has been engaging with both parties regularly throughout the lockout period,” Labour Minister Don Morgan responded in a statement.

“We continue to encourage both parties to return to the bargaining table where the provincially appointed mediator can assist parties in negotiating an agreement.”

Dias said Unifor’s lawyers are looking at a judge’s decision to fine the union $100,000 for violating an injunction that limits how long pickets can hold up traffic going in and out of the refinery.

He also said he is to meet with Regina police Chief Evan Bray following mischief charges earlier this week against 14 union members, including himself.

Dias said he hopes Bray will contact the refinery, request a cooling-off period and urge the company to get back to the table.

Bray has said blocking access to a business is illegal and police are deciding whether to lay further charges.

The company locked out more than 700 workers in early December after they voted overwhelmingly in favour of a strike. The main issue is pension plan changes the company wants to make.