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Couche-Tard to expand EV charging capacity in North America

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Following on its successful initiative with EV (electric vehicle) charging facilities in Europe, Montreal-based Alimentation Couche-Tard has announced it plans to offer charging sites at west coast U.S. and Canada locations of Circle K stores, as well as Couche-Tard properties in Quebec. The company announced it will also look at offering home-based EV charging facilities in U.S. and Canadian markets in a move to expand its revenue stream as carbon-based fuels decline in popularity.

Our goal will be to follow the path were on in Norway,Alimentation Couche-Tard CEO Brian Hannaschin said during a call last week with media. He reports that, together with an electrification partner, they plan to power up hundreds of sites as they move forward. This follows the company’s initiatives in Norway where Couche-Tard started selling home charging units (launched May 2019 and delivered 1,400 units by Q1/21) and launched 450 EV charger installations at more than 80 Circle K sites in the Nordic country, which is well known for its use of electric vehicles.

Couche-Tard has been an early adopter of EV technology for convenience retail. Indeed, this year they revamped an Oslo c-store and fuel station to be 100% EV. They have 150 EV charging sites presently in operation across Europe (200 expected by end of 2020) and view this as a way to counter the drop in demand for gas and diesel that are key to their business success. Currently, 71% of revenue and 46% of profits come from fuel sales.

Couche Tard is among the world’s largest convenience retailers with 14,350 locations in 25 countries.


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New government program funds alternative fuel infrastructure

Funding available for service stations, convenience stores and car washes

EV promoThe Government of Canada is putting more buzz into the country’s zero-emission infrastructure with a new program (launched February 2020) that puts cash in the hands of facility site developers.

Run by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), the Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Initiative is a $182.5 million program designed to support the establishment of a coast-to-coast charging network for electric vehicles, natural gas stations along key freight corridors and stations for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles in metropolitan centres.

The program will also support the demonstration of next-generation charging technologies as well as host the development of binational (Canada and the United States) codes and standards for low-carbon vehicles and infrastructure.

The program is available to individuals and legal entities that are incorporated or registered in Canada and include both not-for-profit and for-profit organizations. These include a range of groups such as utilities, indigenous and community groups, provincial and municipal departments and agencies as well as private businesses such as service stations, convenience stores and car washes.

Eligible projects include permanent installations serving on-road vehicles that increase current capacity. Sites must be open to the public at all times for EV (Electric Vehicle) fast-chargers and as appropriate for natural gas and hydrogen refuelling stations and offer at least one payment option free of any network membership requirement.

Sites must be completed 18 months after the receipt of the Letter of Conditional Approval for EV fast chargers and two years after the receipt of the Letter of Conditional Approval for natural gas and hydrogen refuelling stations. Applicants must demonstrate at least 50% of secured funding of their share of the project costs; demonstrate that they engaged with the energy supplier where the project will be built and own the land, have access to the land for at least ten years or demonstrate that they can obtain the access to the site for at least ten years where the project will be built.

What’s available under the program? NRCan’s repayable contribution through this program will be limited to a maximum of $5 million per project. For EV fast chargers, the program will pay up to 50% of the total project costs to a maximum of $50,000 per charging unit. For natural gas and hydrogen refuelling stations, the program will pay up to 50% of the total project costs to a maximum of $1 million per refuelling station.

EV fast charger projects located in British Columbia and selected for funding under NRCan’s initiative are automatically eligible for non-repayable provincial funding. The B.C. Clean Energy Vehicle Public Fast Charging Program is funding 25% of the total project costs up to a maximum of $25,000 per EV fast chargers.

 For more information visit www.nrcan.gc.ca


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Ontario Power Generation, Hydro One create Ivy electric vehicle charging network

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Two of Ontario’s biggest utilities have formed a new company to create a province-wide fast-charger network for electric vehicles.

The Ivy Charging Network is scheduled to have 160 Level-3 fast-chargers at its 73 locations throughout southern, eastern and western Ontario.

The Ivy is a limited partnership owned equally by the government-owned Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One Ltd., a publicly traded former Crown corporation that owns the province’s largest electric grid.

They say the Ivy network will be an unregulated business that can provide a new revenue stream for both companies without affecting Ontario electricity rates.

It has selected Greenlots, a member of the Shell Group, to operate and manage the electric charging network.

Natural Resources Canada provided an $8-million repayable contribution to help build the electric vehicle charging network.


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Petro-Canada completes Canada’s Electric Highway

Milton bannerPetro-Canada, a Suncor business, has completed its coast-to-coast network of electric vehicle (EV) fast chargers. With locations from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, EV drivers will now be able to travel across the country with access to a fast charge network.

“With more than 100,000 electric vehicles on the road in Canada and an average of 4,000 EVs added each month, we know that this is an important step in meeting the current and future driving needs of Canadians,” Mark Little, president and chief executive officer, Suncor, said in a release. “We want to be part of the total solution to meet energy demand and reduce the carbon footprint of the transportation system. Canada’s Electric Highway is one of the ways we are able to support the total solution.”

spark-img-3From Victoria, B.C. to Stewiacke, N.S., EV drivers can now charge up at locations along the Trans-Canada highway. With more than 50 sites located in small towns and big cities from the Rockies to the Maritimes, each site features DC fast chargers with both CHAdeMO and CCS/SAE connectors, which support a broad selection of vehicles. The chargers can provide up to a 200 kilowatt charge – enough to provide an 80% charge to most EVs in less than 30 minutes. The units are also capable of 350 kilowatt charging with future upgrades.

In a statement, the company said: “The landscape of fuelling is changing – consumers are looking for choices for low carbon fuel alternatives. Suncor and Petro-Canada will continue to work with governments at all levels to support the transition to a low carbon economy and to provide Canadians with choices for fuel.”

Canada’s Electric Highway is supported in part through $4.6 million in funding from the Government of Canada’s Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Deployment Initiative.

“Zero emission vehicles are critical to our clean energy future and to combatting climate change. Our government is supporting initiatives like Petro-Canada’s coast-to-coast network of EV fast chargers; putting more electric vehicles on our roads, reducing pollution and creating stronger and more sustainable communities,” said Minister of Natural Resources Seamus O’Regan.

 

Petro-Canada operates more than 1,500 retail stations and 300 Petro-Pass wholesale locations nationwide.


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B.C. gives $4 million in rebates for electric vehicle charge stations

The B.C. government is offering rebates for electric vehicle drivers who want to install charging stations at home or work.

Homeowners can get a $350 rebate to install a Level 2 charging station in a single-family home.

A $2,000 rebate is available for installation of a Level 2 charging station designed for multiple users in apartments or workplaces.

The government says in a statement that BC Hydro customers can apply for an additional $350 in a matching rebate to buy and install the equipment in single-family homes.

More than $4 million has been set aside for the new CleanBC rebate program.

Michelle Mungall, minister of energy, mines and petroleum resources, says the rebates will make it easier to switch to electric vehicles.

To qualify for the rebates, the stations must be installed and final documents submitted by March 31.


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Additional charging stations in B.C. add range for eco friendly vehicles

EV Charging Sign_Sm_071219British Columbia is making it easier to explore the province in eco-friendly electric vehicles.

The Ministry of Transportation says 12 vehicle charging sites have been completed and more are on the way.

Nine of the 12 sites offer direct-current equipment, capable of completely charging a fully depleted battery in 30 minutes or less.

Level two chargers at the other three stations, which are part of the Accelerate Kootenays electric vehicle charging network, can recharge an empty battery in two to 10 hours, depending on the vehicle.

The ministry says the completed sites include one between Merritt and Kelowna, two on Highway 3 near Hope and Osoyoos, three north of Kamloops and three in southeastern B.C.

Three more sites on Vancouver Island are located between Port Alberni and Tofino and in Port Renfrew.

The province says more charging stations on Vancouver Island and in the Cariboo, Prince George and Hazelton areas are due for completion later this summer, raising the number of stations across B.C. to more than 1,700.

The government estimates 350,000 electric vehicles are expected on the province’s roads by 2030 and Environment Minister George Heyman says that’s due to the growing awareness of the impacts of climate change.

“We’re committed to a cleaner future here in B.C.,” Heyman says in a statement.

“As part of that, we’re making zero-emission vehicles more accessible. The more electric vehicles we have on our roads, the less we pollute, and that benefits people and communities everywhere.”