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Ottawa’s vaping ad regulations kick in Friday

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Ottawa’s new rules restricting the promotion of vaping products are set to take effect this Friday (Aug. 7), while some point-of-sale regulations will be implemented on Sept. 6.

Health Canada published regulations July 8 prohibiting vaping advertisements in public spaces where youth may be exposed to them.

The nationwide ban on vaping ads applies to all retail locations and online stores that sell e-cigarettes, except for adult-only establishments, such as designated vaping shops. However, “permitted ads displayed where youth are not permitted convey a health warning about vaping product harms.”

This means that c-store operators across the country must remove all window, point-of-sale and in-store marketing materials, as well as product displays.

These requirements are applicable only when a province or territory does not already have such requirements in place. Ottawa stated in a release: “The Government of Canada remains concerned by the rise in youth vaping and is acting to address it.”

These new changes will further restrict the promotion of vaping products, to protect youth from being exposed to advertisements that can induce them to try vaping. It will now be prohibited to advertise vaping products in public spaces if the ads can be seen or heard by youth, whether in brick and mortar stores, online or other media channels.

In addition, the display of vaping products at point-of-sale where youth have access will be prohibited. These changes will also require that any permitted ads displayed where youth are not permitted convey a health warning about vaping product harms. These requirements are applicable only when a province or territory does not already have such requirements in place.”

Health Canada is also considering additional regulatory measures “that would further restrict the nicotine content of vaping products, further restrict flavours in vaping products, and require the vaping industry to provide information about their vaping products, including sales, ingredients, and research and development activities.”

Health Canada has invested more than $12 million over three years in a national vaping public education and prevention campaign.